Resolution/Size

OhMyGosh wrote on 5/17/2019, 5:46 PM

Working on a video project that will have some still pictures in it. The pictures seem incredibly small compared to what I'm used to. Some examples: 720x960 96.6kb, 540x960 70.2kb, 612x612 58.3kb, 443x960 36.4kb. Will they look 'right' in a DVD project? Blu-ray? Is there a rule of thumb that tells you what size will look good in a project? Thanks in advance. Cin

Comments

Eagle Six wrote on 5/17/2019, 6:26 PM

My general rule is no larger than twice the size of my project resolution, but that is 'in general' not 'in stone'

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Musicvid wrote on 5/17/2019, 6:27 PM

Probably DVD size. They might start to get blurry at 1280x720 project size but it's worth a try.

 

OhMyGosh wrote on 5/17/2019, 8:21 PM

Thanks guys, I had no idea. I've never used anything that small. Almost all stills that I have used in the past were between 1.5 and 4MB. On a side note, why do some pictures have the same 'dimension' but the 'size' in MBs is different? Thanks again. Cin

Musicvid wrote on 5/17/2019, 8:37 PM

Depends on how much the image has been compressed. It is called compression ratio.

An image with a 5:1 compression ratio will be 5 tomes smaller than uncompressed.

EricLNZ wrote on 5/17/2019, 9:38 PM

Almost all stills that I have used in the past were between 1.5 and 4MB.

It's the pixel image size that counts, not it's compressed storage file size, although the degree of compression will affect the image quality.

j-v wrote on 5/18/2019, 2:32 AM

I have the next way of working with these that suites me the best.
When you are working on a project, that project has already certain dimensions f.i. HD 1920x1080 pixels.When you add a pictures that has other dimensions it suites not that of the project. For this Vegas has for long time an option to set it right from the moment you add the picture.
That option is in Options/Preferences/Editing (1 on the screenshot), That option make in the Pan/Crop (2) the right dimensions for your present project.
You are still able to arrange the right look with the pan/crop options to move that pan/crop box(3)

When the picture becomes by this too blurry I delete it and use another one.

Last changed by j-v on 5/18/2019, 2:34 AM, changed a total of 1 times.

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3POINT wrote on 5/18/2019, 4:12 AM

Will they look 'right' in a DVD project? Blu-ray? Is there a rule of thumb that tells you what size will look good in a project?

Rule of thumb:

  1. A Picture with the same resolution as video project will keep it's quality.
  2. A Picture with a lower resolution as video project will keep it's quality, but looks bad because Vegas resizes/enlarges picture to project size.
  3. A Picture with higher resolution as video project will loss it's quality, but looks good because Vegas resizes/downscales picture to project size.

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Musicvid wrote on 5/18/2019, 5:45 AM

Almost all stills that I have used in the past were between 1.5 and 4MB.

It's the pixel image size that counts, not it's compressed storage file size, although the degree of compression will affect the image quality.

Yes, it is confusing to compare because the unpacked (8bpp) uncompressed image size will be hidden to the editor unless they dig for the information. A 50 MB compressed file may contain essentially all of the information when unpacked to 200 MB for editing.

OhMyGosh wrote on 5/18/2019, 9:17 AM

     Thank you guys for all the information, and thank you j-v for the picture. They are definitely worth a thousand words in my world!  ;) I guess I got confused by the fact that my computer makes thumbnails all the time for stuff and they are in the kb range and I also know they are very tiny and wouldn't be a good size for a project. After work today I'm going to take a dozen or so and burn them on a DVD just to see for myself what they will look like. Thanks again. Cin

Eagle Six wrote on 5/18/2019, 9:28 AM

After work today I'm going to take a dozen or so and burn them on a DVD just to see for myself what they will look like.

+1

System Specs......
Corsair Obsidian Series 450D ATX Mid Tower
Asus X99-A II LGA 2011-v3, Intel X99 SATA 6 Gb/s USB 3.1/3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
Intel Core i7-6800K 15M Broadwell-E, 6 core 3.4 GHz LGA 2011-v3 (overclocked 20%)
64GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200
Corsair Hydro Series H110i GTX 280mm Extreme Performance Liquid CPU Cooler
MSI Radeon R9 390 DirectX 12 8GB Video Card
Corsair RMx Series RM750X 740W 80 Plus Gold power pack
Samsung 970 EVO NVMe M.2 boot drive
Corsair Neutron XT 2.5 480GB SATA III SSD - video work drive
Western Digitial 1TB 7200 RPM SATA - video work drive
Western Digital Black 6TB 7200 RPM SATA 6Bb/s 128MB Cache 3.5 data drive

Bluray Disc burner drive
2x 1080p monitors
Microsoft Window 10 Pro
DaVinci Resolve Studio 16 pb2
SVP13, MVP15, MVP16, SMSP13, MVMS15, MVMSP15, MVMSP16

fr0sty wrote on 5/18/2019, 7:42 PM

DVD resolution is 720x480, so any image that resolution or greater will look just fine, make sure you burn it in a progressive scan format, not interlaced.

OhMyGosh wrote on 5/18/2019, 11:18 PM

Thank you Fr0sty for your response. So resolution=dimension? And if resolution is all that matters is there any point in having a larger file? I thought the larger the file, the better the quality? Thanks, Cin

EricLNZ wrote on 5/19/2019, 12:03 AM

Yes, resolution = dimension e.g. 720 pixels by 480 pixels. But file size affects the quality of the image carried by those pixels. The greater the compression the greater the quality loss. Greater compression = smaller files, less compression = larger files. You need to find a balance that suits you. Using jpg or png for your images even small compression produces files much smaller than an uncompressed file. With jpg I use 95% quality i.e. only 5% compression.

3POINT wrote on 5/19/2019, 1:23 AM

Greater compression = smaller files, less compression = larger files.

Depends also on the kind of picture, a graphic, like a logo, with a few colours and less details can be a very small file. Because the compression can also be very effective and doesn't mean automatic quality loss. The same counts for video.

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fr0sty wrote on 5/19/2019, 1:52 AM

Compression takes the pixels in those dimensions and decides how it can remove data from them in order to reduce file size. The method is complex, but to over-simplify it, it basically takes the image and divides it up into sections, and decides if it can make all the pixels in that section the same color without you being able to notice it. The higher the compression, the smaller the file, but the more of that native pixel data is going to be removed in favor of this approximating based on groups of pixels that it makes the same color, and this will eventually lead to a very washed out, grainy, pixelated image. So, you can have a 30kb DVD quality image at 720x480, and it'll probably look rough, but a 0.5mb image of the same exact resolution, being far less compressed, will look much closer to the original.