Device to limit peaks during recording?

Comments

rraud wrote on 8/24/2018, 11:31 AM

I recommend you disengage the 'Gate/Expander' section. Expanding is best left for post if needed.
For general peak limiting, I would start by setting the Ratio to around 10:1 with a 1 to 5 ms attack time and a 300 to 500 ms release. Playback (or perform) program audio and 'lower' (usually counter-clockwise) the 'Threshold' to get the desired amount of gain reduction. Generally, the gain reduction meter indicates how much gain reduction is taking place. Set the 'Peak Stop' threshold so it kicks in on extreme peaks, as I recall, there is an indicator LED. Adjust the 'Output' to compensate for any overall volume loss.
Unfortunately this is like explaining 'how to drive a car', so a lot of it is listening and hands-on practice to get the desired results. Perhaps enlist a local audio pro for a brief tutorial.

diverG wrote on 9/14/2018, 5:35 AM

Found this tutorial on using Loudmax within Edius.  Same use age logic will also apply to Vegas.

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MikeLV wrote on 9/24/2018, 4:49 PM

I recommend you disengage the 'Gate/Expander' section. Expanding is best left for post if needed. For general peak limiting, I would start by setting the Ratio to around 10:1 with a 1 to 5 ms attack time and a 300 to 500 ms release. Playback (or perform) program audio and 'lower' (usually counter-clockwise) the 'Threshold' to get the desired amount of gain reduction. Generally, the gain reduction meter indicates how much gain reduction is taking place. Set the 'Peak Stop' threshold so it kicks in on extreme peaks, as I recall, there is an indicator LED. Adjust the 'Output' to compensate for any overall volume loss.
Unfortunately this is like explaining 'how to drive a car', so a lot of it is listening and hands-on practice to get the desired results. Perhaps enlist a local audio pro for a brief tutorial.

@rraud, thanks for the instructions. I'm just now getting around to trying the unit out. In a previous reply, you, or someone else said to set the compression ratio to 1:1 (fully counter clockwise) to disable the compressor feature. So I am a little confused. To use the limiter, do I also need to be using the compressor? Here's a photo of what the front of the unit looks like and its controls. On channel 1, I will have the voice mic for talking, as well as the backing track (never used simultaneously) On channel 2, I will have the guitar.

rraud wrote on 9/25/2018, 10:17 AM

I usually use a soft-knee setting (DBX 'over-easy') on mic'd guitars with about a 2.5:1 ratio with very little or no 'peak stop' limiting. Of course this depends on many variables, (the instrument, the player, style, microphone(s), environment, ect.)... subjective as well. For narration/dialog, I prefer 'about' the same ratio but with a hard-knee compression setting, Adjust the threshold/ratio/attack/release so the gain reduction is inaudible as possible, but does the job (easy to say). 3 to 6 decibels of gain reduction is 'normal' for narration but can vary. A 1:1 compression ratio does not reduce gain, regardless of the threshold setting the 'peak stop' and make up gain still function though.

In post, I use manual leveling (volume envelopes) to further even out a narration track.