Looking for new software

Comments

Dexcon wrote on 6/9/2019, 7:40 AM

Not to be a negative nanny or anything, but NO ONE will ever want to watch and hour long ride

Yet Slow-TV is very popular these days. Search YouTube with 'slowtv' and there are dozens of postings of slowtv where cameras (single or otherwise) follow a journey from the departure point to the destination. Some of the YT postings are up to 10 hours long. The BBC recently produced a multi-hours long canal trip, and Australia's SBS-TV has produced several including the east-west Indian Pacific train trip as well the north-south Ghan train trip, each of those being 3 hours - and there were 17 hours versions as well (multi cameras on the train, distant landscape cameras as well as aerial shots). Motion linked titles - along with burnt in historic photos and images - provided a history of the passing towns and locations during the journey. The programmes, aired on a Saturday night from memory, were quite popular for a usually low-rating TV station. Keep in mind that the demographic audience was possibly in an older age group.

Particularly in the UK, train drivers have attached good quality cameras to the front of their trains and recorded the journeys, but often just shortening the stops along the way. An amazing example is a train trip from London to Brighton lasting just over one hour(author: FourFoot - who has plenty more great videos).

@Ghost-rider ... please don't be dissuaded from doing what you're doing - slowtv is a bit trendy these days. BUT, keep in mind that your audience first needs to attuned to the concept of slowtv otherwise it could well end up to be boring for them. Think about value-adding to the production to maintain viewer interest.

 

petecarney wrote on 6/9/2019, 9:45 AM

Wow @dexcon !!! Who would could ever believe anyone and I mean even a single person could sit and watch one of those. Either a testament to how fake the internet is or how drugged up our world has become.

Dot wrote on 6/9/2019, 9:48 AM

Just because they were created doesn't mean anyone is watching. And did they make any money?😬

Ghost-rider wrote on 6/9/2019, 12:37 PM

Not to be a negative nanny or anything, but NO ONE will ever want to watch and hour long ride

Yet Slow-TV is very popular these days. Search YouTube with 'slowtv' and there are dozens of postings of slowtv where cameras (single or otherwise) follow a journey from the departure point to the destination. Some of the YT postings are up to 10 hours long. The BBC recently produced a multi-hours long canal trip, and Australia's SBS-TV has produced several including the east-west Indian Pacific train trip as well the north-south Ghan train trip, each of those being 3 hours - and there were 17 hours versions as well (multi cameras on the train, distant landscape cameras as well as aerial shots). Motion linked titles - along with burnt in historic photos and images - provided a history of the passing towns and locations during the journey. The programmes, aired on a Saturday night from memory, were quite popular for a usually low-rating TV station. Keep in mind that the demographic audience was possibly in an older age group.

Particularly in the UK, train drivers have attached good quality cameras to the front of their trains and recorded the journeys, but often just shortening the stops along the way. An amazing example is a train trip from London to Brighton lasting just over one hour(author: FourFoot - who has plenty more great videos).

@Ghost-rider ... please don't be dissuaded from doing what you're doing - slowtv is a bit trendy these days. BUT, keep in mind that your audience first needs to attuned to the concept of slowtv otherwise it could well end up to be boring for them. Think about value-adding to the production to maintain viewer interest.

 


Trust me I'm not. I got directed to TMPGEnc Authoring work 6 and it looks pretty good. Their demo is the full version without exception. Like any software I had to figure out how to set it up but ran a 2:18 hour video and the BD file structure was 16g and looked damn good. I figured out how to set up a 2nd 24/06 audio track( it took some time) and I raised the encoder levels to the highest point, I don't mind extra encoding time. This may be what I'm looking for. I do appreciate all the help from the forum. The verdict is not in yet but the default encoder levels look much better that the 2min version of MSP.

petecarney wrote on 6/9/2019, 10:54 PM

@Dot there are vids in that catagory with 2.9 mil views or more! Tons with hundreds of thousands of views. Truly hard to believe.

 

@Ghost-rider really do wish you the best with what ever you end up working with! Oldmanitis is a B sometimes and not necessarily appropriate for the times :)

Cheers,

Pete

 

karma17 wrote on 6/14/2019, 1:37 AM

Vegas Pro, Humble Bundle is a no-brainer decision. Best deal of the century. Impossible to go wrong. Vegas excels at audio with multiple tracks and DVD Architect is one of the extant programs that burns Blu Ray and DVD. Call me old fashion, but I still burn Blu Rays all the time. Adobe Encore went belly up. A lot of people dismiss DVDs, but it is one of the ways left for independent distribution of your work. I know streaming is all the rage, but you may have content that doesn't meet their criteria. By having a DVD, you have a tangible product you can sell or give to people and also maintain inventory control over. DVDs are like books of the digital age. They seem obsolete in the face of streaming, but as I write this I am staring at a wall with over 5oo DVDs on it. DVDs I still watch to this day and will watch far into the future despite all the clouds and streaming.