OT: Time is Running Out...

John_Cline wrote on 7/22/2016, 3:41 PM
If you’ve somehow come this far without upgrading to Windows 10, now is the time, the software is getting a big price hike starting July 30th, from $0 to $120.

On August 2nd, Microsoft will be launching its anniversary update to the OS, which will also be free if you have Windows 10. Get in on it for free before it’s too late.

I have had no problems whatsoever with Windows 10 on any of my machines. Your mileage may vary.

Comments

Former user wrote on 7/22/2016, 4:17 PM
Windows 10 has worked fine for me.
Paul Fierlinger wrote on 7/22/2016, 6:00 PM
I have Windows 10 still running on top of Win 7 pro. Is it a good idea for me to upgrade and be free of the W7 background? I too have no problems with W10 but maybe I'm missing something I don't even know about or is there even something dire lurking in that background for me to experience after it becomes too late?
JJKizak wrote on 7/22/2016, 6:42 PM
Windows 10 hooked up everything that was in my Windows 7 32 bit pro computer except Security Essentials which was combined with Windows Defender. It also kept giving me a message that it was turning on Windows Defender when it was already on but quit it after a 10 boots. Vegas 11 menus all screwed up but I set and saved the view I wanted then when opened again select the view I want and everything OK. No problem with DVD-A 5.2 menus. I also had to install my homegroup password again for some reason but it's fine now.
All in all I like it a lot and that is saying something.
JJK
PeterDuke wrote on 7/22/2016, 7:29 PM
"I have Windows 10 still running on top of Win 7 pro. Is it a good idea for me to upgrade and be free of the W7 background?"

There is no Win 7 background. The background you have is all your installed programs, (now called apps, ugh!!) and your Windows preference settings. Some breakages may have occurred, requiring reinstallation and/or re-tweaking. Any crud you had before will still be there.

Over a period of time after installations and uninstallations, crud in the form of abandoned files and unnecessary registry settings will be left behind, so there is an advantage in doing a clean installation from time to time. A system upgrade is a good time to do it.

I have experienced sluggish response from time to time, so I did a clean installation, but it did not seem to help.

I currently have another minor irritation that I don't know how to fix, so I intend to go back to an earlier system image to see if that gets rid of it. That will require some reinstallation, including one program that has a messy validation process, so I am putting it off.

When you upgrade to Windows 10, your previous Windows is stored in a folder on your C drive. If you don't intend to revert back, you can delete this folder and regain disk space. By rights you should have saved a system image with your favourite backup software before upgrading, so you can still go back even if you do delete that folder.
john_dennis wrote on 7/22/2016, 10:01 PM
I've done clean installations of Windows 10 on three of four of my systems with one and only on SSD in the machine using the Windows 7 product keys. I saved the Windows 10 out-of-the-box images for each hardware platform and will populate each with applications as I get the urge. I'll continued to run Windows 7 until I reach some tipping point but have the option of switching to Windows 10 at some time in the future. I'm building applications on one system as I write this.
relaxvideo wrote on 7/23/2016, 12:40 AM
Currently i don't need w10 and i like the free upgrade because i have win7, but i fear because of too many bad things about the spy issues :(
PeterDuke wrote on 7/23/2016, 12:52 AM
" but i fear because of too many bad things about the spy issues "

Time to watch "Dr Strangelove OR How I learned to stop worrying and love the bomb."
relaxvideo wrote on 7/23/2016, 2:17 AM
you think its normal what win10 do.. i dont
John_Cline wrote on 7/23/2016, 6:08 AM
What kind of spying issues are you talking about? As long as they don't have access to my bank account, I couldn't possibly care any less what they know about me, I'm really not that interesting.
Paul Fierlinger wrote on 7/23/2016, 7:44 AM
>>>>>When you upgrade to Windows 10, your previous Windows is stored in a folder on your C drive. If you don't intend to revert back, you can delete this folder and regain disk space. By rights you should have saved a system image with your favourite backup software before upgrading, so you can still go back even if you do delete that folder.<<<<<<
Thank you Peter for the clear explanation. What would the folder be called? I have no ida what to look for. My Win10 had slowed down on a couple of occasions and after each update it burst forward with new energy. I learned to love every update and looked forward to them because they seemed to recognize every malady I had been occasionally experiencing and fixed these. Now, for a long time I've been swimming free so I guess I'm not going to fix what ain't broken __ except get rid of that superfluous folder you talk about.
JJKizak wrote on 7/23/2016, 10:56 AM
You can delete the old windows file if your permissions will not allow you too. If one file in the folder will not delete do to permissions you cannot delete the folder. Mine will not allow and trying to figure out how to work permissions will require a degree in Quantum Mechanics. This crap started with Windows 7.
JJK
PeterDuke wrote on 7/23/2016, 8:17 PM
Here is a blog on removing the folders of old stuff.

I have noticed that if you fiddle around trying to install that you might end up with extra folders with slightly different names. You should have no trouble recognising them.

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/delete-windows-old-folder/

Here is another blog that I just came across. It says that the unwanted folders will evaporate in due course anyway.
http://www.cnet.com/au/how-to/how-to-delete-the-windows-old-folder-from-windows-10/

Spectralis wrote on 8/5/2016, 12:05 PM
The link below was the only way I managed to delete the Windows.old folder on two Win 10 upgrades. All the other methods failed to get rid of it. Hope it helps.

http://www.fixedbyvonnie.com/2014/01/folder-access-denied-delete-folder-windows/#.V6TFfzsrI1J

The privacy issues in Win 10 are a very big concern because there is no way of knowing exactly what information MS is gathering from your PC. And there's no way of switching this off because MS can circumvent any user fixes with the next update. At least Google's spyware is free unlike Win10. The contract you sign with MS when Win 10 is installed allows them to own this data. I didn't upgrade my audio and video editing PC's due to concerns about privacy issues and ownership of that data.
deusx wrote on 8/5/2016, 3:56 PM
>>>>there is no way of knowing exactly what information MS is gathering from your PC<<<

That has always been the case. It it has always been the case with Apple, Google, whoever, too.

Everything they say is bull$hit, so all you can do is decide whether to use it and how much you want to bother with trying to minimize the damage you think they are doing to you.

Spectralis wrote on 8/5/2016, 6:12 PM
Except that Google products are free (apart from data collection) and aren't needed to run the software we use to edit video. Win10 is a significant step-up in data collection and rivals Facebook in its lack of transparency concerning privacy which makes it very different to Win 7 & 8.1. Apparently France is so concerned about this that it's ordered MS to comply with French data protection laws. Let's hope the UK follows suit.

There's a deeper ideological problem with using these huge data sets to determine everything from marketing to social policy. They promote a crude and deterministic view of social behaviour. They encourages values determined by those who collect and process data about us that is often superficial and incomplete. There's little or no control by us over how these data sets are used, who analyses them or what their agenda is. But the underlying purpose of all this data collection is to influence social behaviour. We're encouraged to accept greater intrusion into our private lives allegedly for the good of ourselves or society and this facilitates further intrusion. This vicious circle enhances the ability of those collecting the data to regulate behaviour by pressurising people to conform to their values. What Orwell didn't foresee is that instead of just the state spying on us and manipulating our lives we now have multinational corporations getting away with it. The more we acquiesce to this mindset, the more control we hand over to institutions who have their own and not our best interest at heart.