OT: Eyeglasses for Editing

wwaag wrote on 9/14/2015, 3:49 PM
What do you use for editing? Just got my first pair of progressive lenses and was hoping to use them pretty much everything--distance, computer editing and reading. What a disappointment, especially for editing. I have a dual-monitor set-up and sit pretty much at arms length distance--around 30". The progressives seem to have only a single spot where its kind of in focus with the surrounding area pretty blurred. Is this normal? I've gone back to my cheapo "readers" where both screens remain in sharp focus. Before returning them, I'm just curious as to others experience. Thanks.

wwaag

AKA the HappyOtter at https://tools4vegas.com/. System 1: Intel i7-8700k with HD 630 graphics plus an Nvidia 1050ti graphics card. System 2: Intel i7-3770k with HD 4000 graphics plus an AMD RX550 graphics card. System 3: Laptop. Dell Inspiron Plus 16. Intel i7-11800H, Intel Graphics. Current cameras include Panasonic FZ2500, GoPro Hero8 and Hero5 Black plus a myriad of smartPhone, pocket cameras, video cameras and film cameras going back to the original Nikon S.

Comments

musicvid10 wrote on 9/14/2015, 3:56 PM
Single-refraction reading glasses are the only thing that works for me.
John_Cline wrote on 9/14/2015, 4:43 PM
Reading glasses don't work for me since my eyes require different correction strengths. If you use reading glasses and your eyes are mismatched as most are, your brain will end up using whichever eye/glasses combination that produces the sharpest focus and will ignore the other eye. This can and will cause headaches.

Every time I get a new prescription, I get two pair of glasses; one set of progressives for everyday use and one set of fixed focus glasses for computer use. When I am measured for the new prescription, I tell the optometrist exactly how far I sit from the monitors and she will test for that distance and then gives me a separate prescription.

It's slightly inconvenient to have two pair of glasses but it is the optimum solution for seeing with maximum clarity.
JJKizak wrote on 9/14/2015, 5:19 PM
I just use plain Walgreen 1.5's for about 14 dollars.
JJK
GeeBax wrote on 9/14/2015, 5:55 PM
I agree about single prescription lenses, progressive are too difficult to use.
ushere wrote on 9/14/2015, 6:20 PM
+1 single fixed focus (set to monitor distance - approx arms length)
NormanPCN wrote on 9/14/2015, 6:38 PM
I have computer glasses. They are basically 1 diopter different than would typically be prescribed for me as reading glasses given the arms length distance of the computer screen.

I am very near sighted (-4) and wear glasses and with older eyes I cannot focus as close as years gone by. A few years ago I decided that computer glasses were the way to go. For reading close, my mypoia takes care of the old eyes syndrome since I just take my glasses off and move the paper close enough.
PeterDuke wrote on 9/14/2015, 6:59 PM
I tried progressive for a while after using bifocal. I was pleased that objects about 2 metres away could now be seen sharply, but I found the constant struggle to find the correct angle to twist my head and the tunnel vision too much for me.

I now use bifocal for everyday use, single focus for reading a book or writing, and bifocal computer glasses for computer use and reading. The the two foci are about 30 cm and 50 cm. (I used to have single focus computer glasses, but they were a nuisance when I needed to read or write as well as read the computer screen.)

I also have bifocal sunglasses.
Downunder wrote on 9/14/2015, 7:55 PM
I use "Multifocal" lens (glasses) with two monitors and have no issue with using them, it is just a matter of getting used to them by getting seat and back rest of your chair at the right position/height and swiveling your head just a little more for twin monitors. Important to have your glasses coated with anti glare. Also for my next script I will be adding the "blue" tint (not seen by the naked eye) which helps in relieving tired yes from the brightness of looking at monitors for long periods. I believe airport traffic controllers who wear glasses have this "blue" tint on their glasses even though their screens may not be as bright as ours.

Lee
Chienworks wrote on 9/14/2015, 8:49 PM
I got my first pair of progressive about 6 months ago. It was horrible at first, couldn't find any way to see anything clearly. But, i stuck with it, switching back to my old glasses only for driving. It took about a 2 weeks to get used to them and not need the old ones anymore. After a couple months i don't even notice them anymore as everything i look at just works. I do find myself having to push them up my nose all the time as that is the position they were calibrated for.

I think what threw me off the worse is that the closeup section is only a small portion of the bottom of the lenses, rather than the whole width of the lens. I didn't expect that. I spent a lot of time sitting in front of side-by-side triple monitors so i ended up having to move my head back and forth a lot instead of just moving my eyes, but apparently i've gotten used to it now and don't even notice it anymore. Still though, i think had i realized that would be the design of the lens i would have asked for full width.

So, just hang in there. Your eyes and brain have a wonderful way of adapting when you give them the chance.
Former user wrote on 9/14/2015, 9:34 PM
I have regular old bifocals, but I end up taking my glasses off when I edit so I don't have to tilt my head up so high. I had "computer glasses" for a while. They are fixed focal to be clear at about 3 feet away. But whenever I looked away from the screen, everything was blurred. I cannot wear progressive lenses. I felt like I was in a tunnel.
NickHope wrote on 9/14/2015, 10:17 PM
Varifocals. I guess they are they also called progressive lenses. +1.75 at the top for my monitors and +2.5 at the bottom for reading. The bottom is sharper than the top. I see some chromatic abberation at the top (e.g. white text on black background splits into red and green a little), and I sometimes struggle to judge fine focus. They're ok though. I could imagine trying plain lenses again at some point.
ritsmer wrote on 9/15/2015, 3:14 AM
With a 40" Philips 4065 UHD monitor in front and a 30" to the right I really need a good sight in the full field of view.
So as near-sighted (-2,5 + some cylinder) every time I get a new prescription, I get 4 pair of glasses; two sets of progressives for everyday (clear and sun glasses) plus one fixed focus glasses for computer use and one fixed focus for watching the large plasmas in the house.
All 4 in the same type of frame (light rimless titanium) to facilitate changing without noticing.
It is really expensive to get older...
PeterDuke wrote on 9/15/2015, 4:44 AM
"It is really expensive to get older..."

Glasses are cheaper than hearing aids and are generally more effective...
Richard Jones wrote on 9/15/2015, 4:52 AM
I have had varifocals for many years and only rarely find any difficulty when editig although I do sometimes have a problem when trying to read the small on-screen print in a forum such as this... When you buy a new pair you are often offered a second non-varifocal pair for free, If you explain to the optician what it is you do at your editing suite and tell him the distance from your eyes at the normal editing position to your monitor(s) he will be able to provide a tailor made pair for editing.

Richard
DGates wrote on 9/15/2015, 6:24 AM
I'll use moderate reading glasses for editing, and then more powerful ones when I'm shooting.

JJKizak wrote on 9/15/2015, 6:30 AM
Hilarious.
JJK
JohnnyRoy wrote on 9/15/2015, 7:16 AM
> "What do you use for editing? Just got my first pair of progressive lenses and was hoping to use them pretty much everything--distance, computer editing and reading. What a disappointment, especially for editing."

wwaag , I use progressive lenses for editing and I absolutely LOVE THEM!

Here is the secret: You need to move your head like a Owl! This spooked me when I first got them. In fact, I was building a new computer and I was looking at the case on an angle and it looked bent. I was ready to send it back until I took my glasses off to see that it was perfectly straight.

You have it get out of the habit of moving or eyes to look around and get into the habit of moving your entire head to look around like an owl does. Only move you eyes to shift from distance (top), to commuter (middle), to reading (bottom).

Don't give up. It took me about a week to get use to my progressives. You really need to give them a chance but now I love them. They build up your neck muscles. lol :-D

~jr
wwaag wrote on 9/15/2015, 10:10 AM
Thanks so much for all of your replies. I guess one thing we have in common is a set of "old eyes". It seems that only a few have gotten use to wearing progressives all the time, but the majority still use a separate pair for editing. At the moment, my inclination is to do the latter, although I guess I really should make the attempt. I must admit I do like them for everyday use--driving, walking, etc. I've had very little problem adjusting other than tearing. Its just sitting in front of the computer screen for hours on end that remains a problem. Again, thanks.

wwaag

AKA the HappyOtter at https://tools4vegas.com/. System 1: Intel i7-8700k with HD 630 graphics plus an Nvidia 1050ti graphics card. System 2: Intel i7-3770k with HD 4000 graphics plus an AMD RX550 graphics card. System 3: Laptop. Dell Inspiron Plus 16. Intel i7-11800H, Intel Graphics. Current cameras include Panasonic FZ2500, GoPro Hero8 and Hero5 Black plus a myriad of smartPhone, pocket cameras, video cameras and film cameras going back to the original Nikon S.

wombat wrote on 9/23/2015, 2:08 AM
I went to my optometrist with this problem more than a decade ago. I had been on multi-focal lenses for normal use for a very long time.

She asked me for the exact distance I sat from computer screens, and made up single prescription, slightly magnifying glass lenses to go in a largish frame.

This was inexpensive and has made a huge difference to clarity, eye fatigue and headaches when working long hours on computer screens.

And I haven't had to change that prescription at all over the years, while my every day use multi-focal prescriptions have moved on 3 or 4 times since then.

Steve
Richard Jones wrote on 9/23/2015, 3:03 AM
Yes, this is the suggestion I put forward a few posts back but I should have added that you may well find it easier if you ensure that the"editing" glasses you use are not the Reactolight type (i.e. those that darken with the intensity or brightness of the light).I also find it preferable to have clear lenses whenever I have to use the screen on the camera rather than the view finder.

Richard
musicvid10 wrote on 9/23/2015, 5:56 AM
Whether single vision, multifocal, or progressive lenses, it is good sense to always remove your reading glasses when going down stairs. It's actually a cause of falls and injuries in older folks that is preventable.

GeeBax wrote on 9/23/2015, 5:54 PM
[I]Whether single vision, multifocal, or progressive lenses, it is good sense to always remove your reading glasses when going down stairs. It's actually a cause of falls and injuries in older folks that is preventable.[/I]

Well, you learn something every day. I always thought those falls were due to being drunk. Next time I will take me glasses off.
CJB wrote on 9/23/2015, 9:43 PM
Use "office progressives". They are not for long distance, rather designed for focus at reading distance ~16" to maybe 3 feet" a bit past your monitor. You do have to move your head a little bit but nothing like a full range progressive. I love them!!!!
john_dennis wrote on 9/23/2015, 10:54 PM
I've been lucky that I don't use glasses for computer work, only for driving. Lately, I've found it impossible to read manuals and other paper, though. Other than my loss of vision, there seems to be two reasons for my difficulty:

1) Manufacturers print the documentation on postage stamps.

2) Everyone seems to use low contrast text. Here is a post card that a family friend sent us to announce the opening of her new business. The darkest pixel in the small text is 200,197,202 on a 255,255,255 background.

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