Can you please help me fix this over-exposed video clip?-Sony Vegas16

daniel-t2081 wrote on 6/4/2019, 5:50 PM

Hey guys. This is a snapshot from a video clip that I shot with a drone. As you can see, the shot is really over-exposed, and you can hardly see the snow on the mountains in the background Can you guys please explain how I can fix this shot using sony vegas pro 16!?I have no experience with any kind of color correction. I would really appreciate the help!

 

Comments

rs170a wrote on 6/4/2019, 6:05 PM

Try this solution, originally courtesy of user malowz, repeated by user John Cline in this thread:
https://www.vegascreativesoftware.info/us/forum/overexposure--94837/
I think you'll be very pleased with the result.

Try adding this FX chain:
Invert > Levels > Invert
Then go to the Levels FX and adjust the gamma slider. This will tame the overexposed whites without affecting the mid and dark tones. If this doesn't work, it is likely that the image was so overexposed that it clipped and there is no information to be retrieved.

 

Mike

daniel-t2081 wrote on 6/4/2019, 6:15 PM

Try this solution, originally courtesy of user malowz, repeated by user John Cline in this thread:
https://www.vegascreativesoftware.info/us/forum/overexposure--94837/
I think you'll be very pleased with the result.

Try adding this FX chain:
Invert > Levels > Invert
Then go to the Levels FX and adjust the gamma slider. This will tame the overexposed whites without affecting the mid and dark tones. If this doesn't work, it is likely that the image was so overexposed that it clipped and there is no information to be retrieved.

 

Mike


Thank you for your reply. So do I do any action on the Invert section? Or literally just open them, and then adjust the gamma slider on the LEVELS section?

Rainer wrote on 6/4/2019, 6:49 PM

Just open. Move the gamma all the way to the right. Magic happens.

Reason for edits: I was going to say also you can mask the pale sky, chroma key it and replace with sky blue, but had second thoughts, just quit while you'r ahead.

john_dennis wrote on 6/4/2019, 7:32 PM

Just tell me when to stop...

Some of the detail in the clouds may be gone forever, but who looks at cotton balls for sharp detail.

daniel-t2081 wrote on 6/4/2019, 8:44 PM

Just tell me when to stop...

Some of the detail in the clouds may be gone forever, but who looks at cotton balls for sharp detail.

Wow! Thank you so much for taking the time to do this. You are incredible.

daniel-t2081 wrote on 6/4/2019, 8:44 PM

Just open. Move the gamma all the way to the right. Magic happens.

Reason for edits: I was going to say also you can mask the pale sky, chroma key it and replace with sky blue, but had second thoughts, just quit while you'r ahead.


Thank you for your advice.

walter-i. wrote on 6/5/2019, 2:08 AM

@john_dennis

@Rainer
 

Only for my understanding:
What does the "Invert FX" in this case - can you explain that?

Thanks in advance
Walter

Last changed by walter-i. on 6/5/2019, 2:09 AM, changed a total of 1 times.

Camcorder: Pana HDC SD909, Sony FDR-AX53
Hardware: P8Z77-V LE Plus Vers.0910, Core i7-2600K 3,4 GHz, 16 GB Ram, Radeon HD 6870, SSD 250 GB, W7 HP 64
NLE: Vegas Pro11-15, Heroglyph4, RespeedR

JN_ wrote on 6/5/2019, 5:06 AM

I occasionally save a tip or two that are useful, copy and paste doesn’t always work, in this case I believe I may have transcribed, so many thanks to Malowz, please correct it Malowz if needed ...

Overexposed...by “Malowz”

Put 3 FX filters ... An “Invert” at 100%, a “Colour Corrector”, and an “Invert” at 100%.

Then lift up the gamma of the colour corrector in the middle.  This darkens highlights first, in a logarithmic fashion, similar to an iris closing.  You can also put a colour corrector secondary to select reds and lower the gamma a bit.

 

White Balance ... by “Malowz”

Put 4 FX filters ... Invert, Levels, Levels, Invert. 

Put both “Invert” at 100%.  

In one “Levels” select the red channel and in the other “Levels “ select the blue channel, green remains untouched.  

Adjusting the gamma slider, you compensate the gain on each colour channel.  

Using the in/out sliders, you can fine tune the blacks and white points of each channel.

 

Desktop and Laptop basic specs ...

Both run Win 10 ...

Running latest ver. of Vegas Pro with latest updates.

VP13 B453 also.

Vegaseur and Pluraleyes installed on both ...

Quicktime 7.79.80.95

PC ...

i9 9900K, Intel Graphics 630. Nov 2018.

Mem. 32gb DDR4 Nov. '18.

Graphics card .. Nvidia Rtx 2080 Ti

Nvidia Graphics driver .. latest Studio driver.

Intel Graphics driver

 

Laptop ... (Acer Predator G9-793-77AC)

CPU .. i7-6700HQ Skylake-H

Memory ..16GB DDR4 

Graphics card .. Nvidia GTX 1070, latest Studio driver.

Dexcon wrote on 6/5/2019, 5:45 AM

@rs170a … many thanks for posting the suggestions in the earlier posts. I had some overexposed seaside shots which I was really struggling with. Following applying the Invert Levels Invert suggestion, the overexposed shots in question are now usable, far exceeding my attempts via other FX means. The improvement is almost miraculous. In some shots without a sky horizon, it would be difficult for the casual viewer to even guess that the original shot was overexposed. Thank you again.

I did do a little color correction via Colorfast 2 on some shots to add a little warmth, but tomorrow I'll try the added points re color channels in Levels as posted by JN_.

Mindmatter wrote on 6/5/2019, 6:26 AM

In addition to this brilliant tweak, I might suggest taming the highlights ( possibly after more precisely defining them via a mask) with NewBlue Colorfast2, which I really find very useful.

rs170a wrote on 6/6/2019, 9:41 AM

@daniel-t2081 and @Dexcon, very glad that I could be of help in your time of need 😁
In all seriousness, thanks goes to Malowz for coming up with the technique. I've used it several times and it's definitely a lifesaver!

Mike

fifonik wrote on 6/8/2019, 2:12 AM

Found the trick some time ago and always wanted to try it.

Today, while creating a new video I've found "over-exposed" fragment. Tryed the hint and really do not understand the idea.

For me it looks like it is possible to get very similar results using Curves. Did I miss anything?

Camcorder: Panasonic X920

Desktop: MB: MSI B350M PRO-VDH, CPU: AMD Ryzen 1600, RAM: G'Skill 16 GB DDR4 2400, Graphics card: MSI RX470 4GB, SSD: Samsung 850 EVO SATA 250MB, HDDs: Seagate & Toshiba 2TB, OS: Windows 10 64-bit 1809

NLE: Vegas Pro 11, 12, 13, 15

daniel-t2081 wrote on 6/8/2019, 3:42 AM

Found the trick some time ago and always wanted to try it.

Today, while creating a new video I've found "over-exposed" fragment. Tryed the hint and really do not understand the idea.

For me it looks like it is possible to get very similar results using Curves. Did I miss anything?

Thank you for taking the time to post this. In your opinion, which method do you think gives the best final product?

fifonik wrote on 6/8/2019, 6:24 AM

I do not know. I've just tried it and noticed no differences with Curves. Probably I missed something important and want to find out what exactly.

Camcorder: Panasonic X920

Desktop: MB: MSI B350M PRO-VDH, CPU: AMD Ryzen 1600, RAM: G'Skill 16 GB DDR4 2400, Graphics card: MSI RX470 4GB, SSD: Samsung 850 EVO SATA 250MB, HDDs: Seagate & Toshiba 2TB, OS: Windows 10 64-bit 1809

NLE: Vegas Pro 11, 12, 13, 15

Dexcon wrote on 6/8/2019, 6:38 AM

@fifonik ... just as a matter of interest, how long did it take to take you to do the Curves approach in comparison to the Invert-Levels-Invert and a slider adjustment approach? Which was quicker?

fifonik wrote on 6/8/2019, 6:48 AM

Not really understand your question. I have not even tried to get the same results.Well, it took about 2 seconds for each as you can see on the video. Is this all only about simplifying of the process?

Camcorder: Panasonic X920

Desktop: MB: MSI B350M PRO-VDH, CPU: AMD Ryzen 1600, RAM: G'Skill 16 GB DDR4 2400, Graphics card: MSI RX470 4GB, SSD: Samsung 850 EVO SATA 250MB, HDDs: Seagate & Toshiba 2TB, OS: Windows 10 64-bit 1809

NLE: Vegas Pro 11, 12, 13, 15

Dexcon wrote on 6/8/2019, 7:04 AM

@fifonik

I only asked because you previously wrote:

I've just tried it and noticed no differences with Curves

... and ...

For me it looks like it is possible to get very similar results using Curves.

From that, I took it that you had tried both approaches as you found little or no differences between the two. Hence, given that you say that you've tried both approaches, which for you was the quicker approach to achieve the same/similar result? Yes, it's about simplifying the process - if the Invert-Levels-Invert (I-L-I) process takes less than a minute to do and the Curves approach takes, say, 5 minutes of adjustments, then the I-L-I approach would logically be the first approach to use and the Curves (and possibly other FX) approach would be if I-L-I doesn't work all that well.

fifonik wrote on 6/8/2019, 7:12 AM

I see. Thanks.

Camcorder: Panasonic X920

Desktop: MB: MSI B350M PRO-VDH, CPU: AMD Ryzen 1600, RAM: G'Skill 16 GB DDR4 2400, Graphics card: MSI RX470 4GB, SSD: Samsung 850 EVO SATA 250MB, HDDs: Seagate & Toshiba 2TB, OS: Windows 10 64-bit 1809

NLE: Vegas Pro 11, 12, 13, 15

dxdy wrote on 6/10/2019, 7:39 AM

I have used this sequence (invert, color corrector, invert) more times than I should admit to, and it really gives me great results. When I first got my drone, before I had ND filters for it, this was a super-important tip.

malowz wrote on 6/10/2019, 1:34 PM

You can get the same results using curve, but much with more difficulty, cause using gamma slider it uses a "mathematically-perfect" logarithmic curve, something very difficult to do manually adding points on curves.

you can also use Gamma with "Color Corrector" filter instead of "Levels", cause they use different processing methods (one uses RGB and other HSL i believe). may make a difference in very saturated or very overexposed images.

after that, selective filters processing only the over-exposed areas can enhance some parts, like sky, skin tones, etc.

my attempt:

 

JN_ wrote on 6/10/2019, 4:15 PM

@malowz

Great tips thanks a lot, I have used to advantage with some very poor SD material, fast, easy.

Last changed by JN_ on 6/10/2019, 4:16 PM, changed a total of 1 times.

 

Desktop and Laptop basic specs ...

Both run Win 10 ...

Running latest ver. of Vegas Pro with latest updates.

VP13 B453 also.

Vegaseur and Pluraleyes installed on both ...

Quicktime 7.79.80.95

PC ...

i9 9900K, Intel Graphics 630. Nov 2018.

Mem. 32gb DDR4 Nov. '18.

Graphics card .. Nvidia Rtx 2080 Ti

Nvidia Graphics driver .. latest Studio driver.

Intel Graphics driver

 

Laptop ... (Acer Predator G9-793-77AC)

CPU .. i7-6700HQ Skylake-H

Memory ..16GB DDR4 

Graphics card .. Nvidia GTX 1070, latest Studio driver.

john_dennis wrote on 6/10/2019, 5:10 PM

My experience is that one can get similar results with Color Curves, but with a lot more work.

Invert / Levels / Invert is a one-knob solution for uniformly over-exposed pictures or videos. 

Sometimes, I don't want to walk through the kitchen to get to my seat in the restaurant.

fifonik wrote on 6/10/2019, 8:45 PM

Thanks everyone. I got the idea. For some reason at the beginning I thought that the I-L-I trick somehow only modifying over exposed areas.

I'm using both Levels and Curves. When I see no heavily over/under exposed areas, I'm using Levels. With over/under exposed areas -- Curves. Sure, the Curves are harder to use and it was real pain at the beginning. Now it is not too hard for me but anyway harder than Levels. In my experience, I almost never applied just logarithmic curve as I have never had fragments like OP where everything over-exposed (I had something like this on scanned old films).

Camcorder: Panasonic X920

Desktop: MB: MSI B350M PRO-VDH, CPU: AMD Ryzen 1600, RAM: G'Skill 16 GB DDR4 2400, Graphics card: MSI RX470 4GB, SSD: Samsung 850 EVO SATA 250MB, HDDs: Seagate & Toshiba 2TB, OS: Windows 10 64-bit 1809

NLE: Vegas Pro 11, 12, 13, 15

malowz wrote on 6/10/2019, 9:27 PM

the "I-L-I" darken/brighten like the camera does (with the limited range of course), and this is the "best" way to do so, cause if you have a overexposed image, darkening it should not crush the blacks or darken too much the image, it affect first the highlights areas, so you can darken the problematic areas first, keeping the image "bright".

also, there is shadow/highlights plugins that do a local area adjustments and some do that in a "smart" way (like Photoshop and Hitfilm Ignite H/S adjustment)